49 American Sign Language (ASL)

Last update: March 16/23

 

Courses

ASL 101 (CC BY-NC-ND) by Christopher Pinto

ASL 102 (CC BY-NC-ND) Author: Christopher Pinto

These American Sign Language courses (101 and 102) are Google Docs containing instructional videos of original design. The documents also offer media content from ASL instructors and creators across the Web. All materials are meant as a supplement to ASL instruction. These resources are in no way intended to replace the breadth of knowledge acquired from taking an ASL course.

 

Supplementary Materials

American Sign Language 101 OER (CC BY-NC-SA) Author: Christopher Pinto

This resource is a Google Doc containing instructional videos of original design. The document also offers media content from ASL instructors and creators across the Web. All materials are meant as a supplement to ASL instruction. These resources are in no way intended to replace the breadth of knowledge acquired from taking an ASL course.

American Sign Language 102 OER (CC BY-NC-SA) Author: Christopher Pinto

This resource is a Google Doc containing instructional videos of original design. The document also offers media content from ASL instructors and creators across the Web. All materials are meant as a supplement to ASL instruction. These resources are in no way intended to replace the breadth of knowledge acquired from taking an ASL course.

Textbooks

Deaf Education (Public Domain) by Joanne Weber

This is a pilot project to explore the efficacy of Pressbooks toward the creation of e-books to deaf learners. The research project undertakes several strands of inquiry in order to develop a proposed theoretical framework that would guide the creation of e-books with the Pressbooks platform.

Fingerspelling – A Mindful Approach (CC-BY) by Karla Johnston

This text will show us how to build a foundation of mindfulness and then ways of consciously and intentionally building our fingerspelling skills for the improvement of our ASL communication. Perhaps you are a professional ASL Interpreter, a student who simply loves ASL or any person, hearing or Deaf, who has within them the intuitive desire to communicate effectively. In the following pages we will tap into our innate desire and answer the question—how do we take a nuance of language, like fingerspelling, and with gentle persistent attention, strive toward clarity and understanding?

Integrated and Open Interpreter Education (CC BY-NC) by Elisa M. Maroney; Amanda R. Smith; Sarah Hewlett; Erin Trine; and Vicki Darden

This OER on interpreting offers authors and readers free and open access to current, relevant, easy-to-access, and free materials. The editors have created a space where emerging scholars in the field of signed language interpreting make contributions with the ability to revise as the interpreting studies discipline and the scholars, themselves, develop and change. This OER provides faculty and students readings and practical application experiences that connect program specific coursework and concepts across the interpreter education curriculum emphasizing the holistic nature of the field of interpreting.

Intermediate Signed Language (not specified) by Zupan, Linda

Sign Language II is designed for signers to enhance conversational expressive and receptive sign skills, to further develop fluidity, gestural expression and to expand vocabulary gleaned in Sign I to better communicate with Deaf, hard-of-hearing and non-verbal individuals. Signers will explore basic grammatical differences between American Sign Language (ASL), Signing Exact English (SEE) and Contact Signing aka Pidgin Signed English (PSE). Students will continue to develop an appreciation of Deaf Culture while further examining issues affecting the deaf and the history and evolution of signed languages through exploration of Deaf literature

Introduction to Signed Language (not specified) by Zupan, Linda

is designed for beginners to communicate with deaf, hard of hearing and non-verbal individuals and develop an appreciation of the Deaf Culture while understanding the history of signed languages and issues affecting the deaf.

 

 

This chapter is adapted from American Sign Language (ASL) in OER by Discipline Directory by Edited by Lauri M. Aesoph and Josie Gray.

License

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OER by Subject Directory Copyright © 2022 by Saskatchewan Polytechnic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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